Check Request Status610-994-7500

HITRUST—What It Is and Why It Matters

What is HITRUST?

Founded in 2007, the Health Information Trust Alliance (HITRUST) evolved in response to the growing privacy and security challenges faced by the healthcare industry. Aligned with its mission to “champion programs that safeguard sensitive information and manage information risk for organizations,” HITRUST provides broad access to common risk and compliance management frameworks.

For example, the HITRUST CSF®, the cybersecurity framework, is a certifiable framework that provides a comprehensive, flexible and efficient approach to regulatory compliance and risk management. Established in 2015, it is a widely recognized security framework focused on the healthcare industry in the U.S. To ensure an inclusive set of baseline security controls, the HITRUST CSF leveraged nationally and internationally acceptable standards including ISO, NIST, PCI and HIPAA. As a result, the framework has been used successfully to demonstrate HIPAA compliance.

HITRUST regularly updates the CSF to incorporate new standards and regulations to make sure the framework remains relevant and current. As new regulations and security risks are introduced, provider organizations and third parties that adhere to the CSF can be well prepared with optimal security based on quarterly updates and annual audit changes.

Why HITRUST Is Important to BA Risk Management

As healthcare organizations face increased risk of privacy and security breach, recognizing the significant role played by their Business Associates (BAs) is critical. Conducting due diligence is essential before the partnership begins, and is part of the provider’s ongoing risk analysis to ensure partners have HIPAA-compliant policies in place to safeguard the privacy and security of protected health information (PHI). In recent years, many provider organizations have incorporated the HITRUST CSF as part of their third-party assurance process—requiring that BAs obtain CSF certification. This is largely due to the increased number of breaches involving third-party vendors.

Healthcare organizations that entrust PHI to a BA must ensure that sensitive information is properly safeguarded. Best practice is for providers to partner with compliant, secure BAs that offer compliance knowledge, guidance and value beyond the standard contracted services. Obtaining CFS certification demonstrates integrity and commitment to privacy and security practices aligned with stringent regulatory requirements and expectations of the healthcare industry.

With those priorities top of mind, MRO announced in May 2018 that its Release of Information platform ROI Online® had earned HITRUST CSF Certified status for information security. HITRUST incorporates a risk-based approach that includes federal and state regulations and standards to help organizations address challenges through a comprehensive framework of prescriptive and scalable security controls.

As healthcare’s most widely adopted security framework, HITRUST provides an industry standard for BA risk management and compliance. Covered entities can look to HITRUST certification for assurance that the foundation for implementing a framework with security controls required to safeguard PHI is already in place.

To learn more about the importance of HITRUST CSF and MRO’s journey to achieve certification, watch our video “MRO’s PHI Disclosure Management Platform ROI Online® Earns HITRUST CSF® Certification.”

Sign Up for Future Blog Posts

Read More

Enterprise-wide PHI disclosure management: Closing the compliance gaps

Compliance Today
Enterprise-wide PHI disclosure management: Closing the compliance gaps
In an article published to HCCA’s December 2018 issue of Compliance Today, MRO’s Rita Bowen discusses how implementing an enterprise-wide strategy to protect patient privacy also protects the institution against breaches, financial risk, lawsuits, and reputational damage.

Read More

Heard on the Hill: AHIMA and AMIA Call for Better Patient Access to Health Information in Congressional Briefing

AHIMA and AMIA Call for Better Patient Access to Health Information in Congressional Briefing

On Wednesday, December 5, 2018, I visited Capitol Hill with colleagues from AHIMA and the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) to address challenges around patient access to health information and to propose ways to modernize HIPAA to better support patient care. As HIM and privacy professionals are aware, the Office for Civil Rights (OCR) released guidance on patient access to health information in February 2016. However, healthcare leaders have been calling for an upgrade to the 22-year-old HIPAA regulation for some time. The recommendations from AHIMA and AMIA were as follows.

Converge HIPAA with Health IT Certification

We recommended creating a new term, Health Data Set (HDS), which would encompass all clinical, biomedical and claims data maintained by the covered entity (CE) or business associate (BA). The data set would be supported through the certification program at the federal Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONCHIT), enabling individuals to view, download or transmit this information electronically to a third party and access this information via API.

We also suggested the revision of the HIPAA Designated Record Set (DRS) and the requirement that Certified Health IT provide the amended DRS to patients electronically while maintaining computability. This revision would give providers and patients greater clarity and predictability regarding what constitutes the DRS.

Extend the HIPAA Individual Right of Access to Non-Covered Entities

In an effort to provide uniformity of health data access, we suggested establishing a uniform health data access policy that would apply not only to CEs and BAs, but also to non-covered entities such as developers of applications/technologies including mHealth and healthcare-based social media.

Encourage Note Sharing with Patients in Real Time

To enhance patient access to health information, we recommended promoting communications efforts such as OpenNotes through Medicare and Medicaid payment programs, such as the Merit-based Incentive Payment System.

Clarify Existing Regulatory Guidance on Third-Party Access to Patient Data

This especially relates to third-party legal requests that seek information without appropriate patient direction and beyond what is part of the DRS. I reported that ROI vendors and providers continue to be challenged with the discernment of third-party versus patient requests for transmittal to a third party. Third-party requesters demand the patient pricing, and the documentation does not always provide assurances that the requester is the patient or that the patient is aware of the request.

Our experience with some high-volume third-party requesters includes their demand for patient pricing and threats of, or actual submission of, OCR complaints. While we are steadfast in our commitment to patients’ privacy, the ongoing dispute by third-party requesters declining to provide reimbursement for healthcare costs in responding to these requests increases the administrative burden on both the health systems and the OCR.

We are asking that the 2016 guidance be updated to specify the original intent that a patient may direct their information to a third party who is specifically “acting on their behalf regarding a healthcare decision.”

MRO is presently working alongside industry experts to construct a white paper that will delve deeper into this topic and provide recommendations. We will share the paper on our blog once it is released.

 

Additional Resources and Media Coverage:

HealthIT Security – AHIMA, AMIA Call for HIPAA Upgrade to Support Patient Access

MedPage Today – Rules Needed for Better Patient Record Access, Say Experts

AHIMA and AMIA – Full Recommendation

Sign Up for Future Blog Posts

Read More